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The Top 5 Flutter State Management Solutions: A Deep Dive

State management is a critical part of any user-facing application’s architecture. It ensures the app’s data and interface remain synchronized while users interact. In Flutter, many state management solutions are available, mostly because of the support of the vast Flutter community.

The Flutter core team also provides some ways to handle the state. This article will touch on the five most renowned Flutter state management solutions.

Specifically, you’ll learn:

  • How to identify comparisons between each state management packages.
  • How to build a simple color toggler widget using each package.
  • What each package does.

Before going into the more advanced packages, you must understand the basic state management packages provided in the core Flutter framework. These “low-level” state management approaches are the primary building block for some of the packages you’ll learn later in this article.

Understanding state management is critical to becoming a competent Flutter developer. By signing up to a Personal Kodeco Subscription, you will gain access to Managing State in Flutter. This video course will teach you the fundamentals of state management from the ground up.

The two low-level state management approaches in the core Flutter framework are setState and InheritedWidget. Both provide a low-level approach to vanilla Flutter state management, especially in cases where the app’s state is relatively small, and the data flow is clear.

What is State Management?

State management describes handling data changes in a user interface, triggered through a user input or a background process accessing a backend service. State management ensures the app’s data and interface remain synchronized and prevents inconsistencies with changes in the data.

How to Use setState

setState is a function that’ll retrigger the creation of a widget tree when a state change occurs. For small apps, setState can be a direct and effective way to manage state changes. All that’s required is attaching a setState command inside a function to trigger a UI rebuild after the state change.

class ColorTogglerPage extends StatefulWidget {
  @override
  _ColorTogglerPageState createState() => _ColorTogglerPageState();
}

class _ColorTogglerPageState extends State<ColorTogglerPage> {
  bool _isRed = true;
  void _toggleColor() {
    setState(() {
      _isRed = !_isRed;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return TextButton(
      style: TextButton.styleFrom(
        foregroundColor: _isRed ? Colors.red : Colors.indigo,
      ),
      onPressed: _toggleColor,
      child: const Text('Change my Color!'),
    );
  }
}

In the example above, put the setState command inside a StatefulWidget. It’s for triggering the UI change on every button toggle and rebuilding the widget every time. Refer to Getting Started With Flutter to see how to use setState in Flutter.

Embed the example to your app and check if button color is changing.

How to Use InheritedWidget

While setState is used mainly to trigger state changes after a state is modified, InheritedWidget propagates state changes down the widget tree. InheritedWidget shares the states across an app through the build contexts of the widget tree.

InheritedWidget can’t modify a state in and of itself — it has to be in unison with setState.

For example, suppose this is the class:

class ColorToggler extends InheritedWidget {
  const ColorToggler({
    super.key,
    required this.isRed,
    required this.toggleColor,
    required super.child,
  });

  final bool isRed;
  final void Function() toggleColor;

  // 1
  static ColorToggler of(BuildContext context) =>
      context.dependOnInheritedWidgetOfExactType<ColorToggler>()!;

  // 2
  @override
  bool updateShouldNotify(ColorToggler old) => isRed != old.isRed;
}

ColorToggler implements the InheritedWidget class and contains required methods for its functionality.

  1. You needs the of method to easily access the toggler.
  2. updateShouldNotify method helps the Flutter to identify when to rebuild the widgets.

The following code shows the usage in nested widgets:

class ColorWidget extends StatefulWidget {
  const ColorWidget({super.key});

  @override
  State<ColorWidget> createState() => _ColorWidgetState();
}

class _ColorWidgetState extends State<ColorWidget> {
  bool isRed = true;

  void toggleColor() {
    setState(() {
      isRed = !isRed;
    });
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return ColorToggler(
      isRed: isRed,
      toggleColor: toggleColor,
      child: const NestedWidget(),
    );
  }
}

class NestedWidget extends StatelessWidget {
  const NestedWidget({super.key});

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    final colorToggler = ColorToggler.of(context);
    return TextButton(
      style: TextButton.styleFrom(
        foregroundColor:
            colorToggler.isRed ? Colors.red : Colors.indigo,
      ),
      onPressed: colorToggler.toggleColor,
      child: const Text('Change my Color!'),
    );
  }
}

All you need to do is initiate ColorToggler at the top of the widget tree and pass down a function with a setState call. When you call toggleColor at a lower-level widget, the state change will be propagated up the tree, and setState will be called to trigger a rebuild of all widgets that depend on it. NestedWidget can be located at any level of widget tree. Using the ColorToggler.of you will find the nearest toggler up the widget tree. The inherited widget is just acting like a bridge.

To learn more, here’s a video lesson explaining how to use InheritedWidget in Flutter.

State Management Packages

State management packages in Flutter only provide an abstraction over setState and InheritedWidget. Most of them use both under the hood. Using a package, you don’t have to orchestrate multiple setState and InheritedWidgets for every component. Examples of state management packages in Flutter include Provider, BLoC (Business Logic Component), MobX, GetX and Redux.

Out of all the packages employed by Flutter users, this article will boil it down to the top five most renowned state management packages, based on a few criteria.

Criteria for Packages

Criteria for evaluating packages include ease of use and setup, testing, learning curve, interoperability, community support and documentation. Here’s an intro for what each criterion entails.

Ease of Setup

Some packages are easier to set up than others — this criterion looks at how easy it is to start with the package.

Testing

Using a package that’ll simplify testing and make it less prone to errors is essential.

Learning Curve

Consider the learning curve, especially when working with a team.

Interoperability

The only static element in Flutter (and software in general) is a const variable. Interoperability becomes crucial, especially when integrating packages or libraries. Having an easy way to migrate to a package is essential.

Community Support and Documentation

This last one is obvious. Packages that receive good support and are well-documented reduce the time required to look into the package source code and test for problems already solved by others in the community.

These five criteria are critical considerations when selecting a package in Flutter.

However, this article selected packages based on popularity, the number of stars, support and community activity within StackOverflow. The top five packages are Provider, BLoC, GetX, MobX and Redux. Let’s get into it and tackle the first package — Provider.

Provider

Provider is a popular package in Flutter that makes state management simple and easy to implement. Provider is simpler compared to other packages on this list. It has a low learning curve and is perfect for small projects with limited complexity.

To begin using Provider, you only need to define a model class that extends ChangeNotifier.

class ColorToggler extends ChangeNotifier {
  bool _isRed = true;
  bool get isRed => _isRed;

  void toggleColor() {
    _isRed = !_isRed;
    notifyListeners();
  }
}

Then insert the ColorToggler provider into the widget to embed its state.

class ColorTogglerPage extends StatelessWidget {
  void _toggleColor(BuildContext context) {
    Provider.of<ColorToggler>(context, listen: false).toggleColor();
  }

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    var isRed = Provider.of<ColorToggler>(context).getColorToggler;
    return TextButton(
      style: TextButton.styleFrom(
        foregroundColor: isRed ? Colors.red : Colors.indigo,
      ),
      onPressed: () => _toggleColor(context),
      child: const Text('Change my Color!'),
    );
  }
}

And finally, create the instance of ColorToggler somewhere higher at widget tree.

class ColorTogglerApp extends StatelessWidget {
  const ColorTogglerApp({super.key});

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      home: ChangeNotifierProvider.value(
        value: ColorToggler(),
        child: ColorTogglerPage(),
      ),
    );
  }
}

The Provider.of in combination with ChangeNotifierProvider listen to a state changes, and when notifyListeners is called, the data will change, thus updating the UI.

Compared with other packages, Provider is easy to implement and is interoperable, requiring little architectural change. However, to use Provider in a large-scale app, you must incorporate better architectural patterns to use it efficiently.

Setting up Provider requires installing the provider package using flutter pub. Next, you must create a Notifier class, like in the previous example. Then, you can create a Listener class and wrap your widget within it or follow the example above and use the Provider.of syntax. Note the former option is more efficient but requires more boilerplate code to run.

As for testability, Provider lacks documentation, but it’s possible if you use the WidgetTester and inject the Provider within its context via the pumpWidget function. The following GitHub Issue is the closest documentation available if you want official documentation.

The Provider.of option gives you immense flexibility when using it with other packages. It can be easily refactored to work with any other state management system, including BLoC architecture, commonly used in Flutter for complex applications requiring more than a basic state management solution.

Provider is a fine choice for developers new to Flutter who want to start with state quickly. Also, it gives you a choice between creating a simple state management solution and a more complex one as your project grows. If you want to read a more in-depth walkthrough of implementing Provider in your application, consider reading this Kodeco article regarding the Provider package.

Comparisons with Riverpod

One alternative to Provider that has gained popularity is Riverpod, which the creator of Flutter Hooks developed. Riverpod is a state management library inspired by Provider but doesn’t have a Flutter vendor lock-in. Removing the need to use the BuildContext allows you to use Riverpod as a Dart package, not just a Flutter package.

Riverpod is an alternative, but sadly, you won’t learn it in this article. It will only serve as a mention of its existence as an alternative to Provider. However, if you want to read more about Riverpod, go to their official getting started page.

BLoC

Another popular state management solution in Flutter is BLoC, which stands for Business Logic Component. Between handling the main user interface and state management, programming UI applications can be complex. BLoC helps you separate UI and business logic, making it easier to maintain the state and update the UI without touching other parts of the code.

In BLoC architecture, a widget will interact with a bloc that manages the business logic and provides it with data. This article will adapt and simplify an example from one of Kodeco’s most recent tutorials for using BLoC 8.0. In the following section, you’ll look at color toggler.

abstract class ColorTogglerEvent {}
class ToggleColorEvent extends ColorTogglerEvent {}

class ColorTogglerBloc extends Bloc<ColorTogglerEvent, ColorTogglerState> {
  ColorTogglerBloc() : super(const ColorTogglerState()) {
    on<ToggleColorEvent>(_onToggleColor);
  }

  void _onToggleColor(
    ToggleColorEvent event,
    Emitter<ColorTogglerState> emit,
  ) {
    // ColorToggler logic...
    emit(state.copyWith(isRed: !state.isRed));
  }
}

You define a BLoC by creating a class that extends from the BLoC class, which defines what type of events the bloc can emit and which functions emit them. Then, inject your BLoC state inside your widget tree via the BLoC providers.

class App extends StatelessWidget {
  const App({Key? key}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      home: BlocProvider(
        create: (ctx) => ColorTogglerBloc(),
        child: const ColorTogglerPage(),
      ),
    );
  }
}

Injecting the BLoC provider from the top of the widget structure helps proliferate your BLoC provider within the app. But to proliferate multiple BLoC providers and access them in the same widget tree, you can research using the MultiBlocProvider.

Here’s an example of how to use it from within the ColorTogglerPage.

class ColorTogglerPage extends StatelessWidget {
  const ColorTogglerPage({Key? key}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    final bloc = context.watch<ColorTogglerBloc>();

    return TextButton(
      style: TextButton.styleFrom(
        foregroundColor: bloc.state.isRed ? Colors.red : Colors.indigo,
      ),
      onPressed: () => bloc.add(ToggleColorEvent()),
      child: const Text('Change my Color!'),
    );
  }
}

The important part inside the code snippet above is final state = context.watch<ColorTogglerBloc>(). This line of code listens to the BLoC state and its corresponding events.

class ColorTogglerState extends Equatable {
  const ColorTogglerState({this.isRed = true});

  final bool isRed;

  ColorTogglerState copyWith({bool? isRed}) {
    return ColorTogglerState(isRed: isRed ?? this.isRed);
  }

  @override
  List<Object?> get props => [isRed];
}

Assume that each ColorTogglerState contains a status property that represents the current color. To display the current color, you can access it via bloc.state.isRed inside ColorTogglerPage‘s build method.

Installing BLoC is straightforward. However, ease of setup is more complicated than the rest, and you need to create a lot of boilerplates for the application to work.

For example, to create a simple application like the previous example, you need to manually define your app’s events, states and blocs. All of those are in separate classes. The BLoC package is a powerful Flutter state management tool but requires more boilerplate code than others.

BLoC provides a native testing package called bloc_test. It implements a comprehensive testing solution for any Flutter app that uses the BLoC package. Testing a BLoC using this package is direct and well-documented. You’ll need not worry about testing your app’s BLoC because this package handles most of the heavy lifting.

BLoC cannot be a “secondary” package you use for state management because it relies on boilerplate code. The only interoperability use would be to use BLoC as your Flutter app’s primary state management solution while using either GetX or Provider for the more straightforward stateless widget solutions.

Finally, documentation is complete, with many examples for developers to follow. BLoC is popular among Flutter developers. You’ll likely find a lot of people sharing other online resources.

The BLoC pattern can make your code more organized and maintainable but requires careful planning and execution. If you want a more in-depth walkthrough of implementing the most up-to-date BLoC version in your application, consider reading this Kodeco article on getting started with BLoC 8.0. It covers the basics of setting up a BLoC pattern in your Flutter application and provides examples.

GetX

Another popular alternative to state management is GetX. GetX is a Flutter package that provides state management, dependency injection, and more. It is praised for its simplicity. Among all the state management solutions featured in this article, GetX is by far the simplest. Developers don’t need to understand new concepts or paradigms to work with GetX.

Flutter users love GetX — it shows in the package’s popularity in pub.dev.

To appreciate the simplicity of GetX, try to implement it yourself. The following example was adapted from the official GetX documentation.

class ColorTogglerController extends GetxController {
  static ColorTogglerController get to => Get.find();
  var isRed = false.obs;
  void toggleColor() {
    isRed.value = !isRed.value;
  }
}

First, create a ColorTogglerController class that extends the GetxController. Inside this class, define the properties and methods that’ll be used to manage your application states, the listed property and the toggleColor function. The suffix .obs makes your properties to be reactive and listanable. The static Controller property allows us to access the controller instance anywhere in our app using ColorTogglerController.to.

Next, use the ColorTogglerController in one of your widgets.

class ColorTogglerApp extends StatelessWidget {
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    Get.lazyPut(() => ColorTogglerController());
    return MaterialApp(
      home: const ColorTogglerPage(),
    );
  }
}

class ColorTogglerPage extends StatelessWidget {
  const ColorTogglerPage({Key? key}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Obx(
      () => TextButton(
        style: TextButton.styleFrom(
          foregroundColor: ColorTogglerController.to.isRed.value
              ? Colors.red
              : Colors.indigo,
        ),
        onPressed: ColorTogglerController.to.toggleColor,
        child: const Text('Change my Color!'),
      ),
    );
  }
}

As you see, the above code is straightforward with a bit of magic. Obx automatically recognize the used and changing observable properties and rebuilds the widgets accordingly. However, GetX also provide two more ways for state management: GetBuilder and GetX<Controller> approaches. A more standard approach GetBuilder rebuilds only the widgets that depend on state changes, reducing unnecessary rebuilds in your app. It does not require properties to be observable. GetX<Controller> similarly rebuilds only some widgets but depends on observable properties.

GetX is similar to Provider in its minimalism. GetX will inject state as observables within your StatelessWidgets accessible directly via the classes.

Tests using GetX are well documented by the package’s creator, especially for its state management solution. You can find the official documentation on the package’s official Pub page.

You can use GetX as the primary or secondary state management solution, which will function just as well. However, pairing GetX with more sophisticated state management solutions such as BLoC might take more of a backseat role, considering BLoC requires more boilerplate to function.

Documentation and community support are good. GetX’s maintainer provides comprehensive documentation on what GetX can do. Find it within GetX’s GitHub. The documentation is easy to understand.

GetX is the intuitive and direct state management solution for Flutter. If you’re looking for an easy-to-learn state management solution that packs a punch, GetX is worth checking out. Compared with simpler solutions such as Provider, setState, and InheritedWidget, GetX requires less boilerplate code to set up and manage your application state, making it an excellent option for beginner and experienced developers.

If you want to learn more about GetX, it has great documentation with working examples for you to follow. So try it and see how GetX can simplify your Flutter state management needs.

MobX

MobX is an all-encompassing state management solution for applications. It uses reactive programming principles to manage application states. MobX is framework agnostic and thus supports multiple JavaScript frameworks and, recently, Flutter.

MobX provides an observable state that notifies when changes occur. The premise of MobX is quite similar to Provider and, so far, less complex than BLoC. But you can start using the package, you have to install the prerequisites for MobX. Of all the packages referenced in this article, MobX requires the most prerequisites because it requires a build runner.

Add the following into your pubspec.yaml:

dependencies:
  mobx: ^2.1.3
  flutter_mobx: ^2.0.6+5

dev_dependencies:
  build_runner: ^2.3.3
  mobx_codegen: ^2.1.1

MobX doesn’t have as much boilerplate code compared with others because it uses the build runner as a code generator to patch the pieces together as one comprehensive state management solution.

For simplicity, you’ll create something similar to the previous GetX example to demonstrate how easy it is to use MobX for state management in Flutter. The example will follow and adapt the examples made by the MobX team in their official documentation.

part 'main.g.dart'; // Assume, the current file is main.dart

class ColorToggler = ColorTogglerBase with _$ColorToggler;

abstract class ColorTogglerBase with Store {
  @observable
  bool isRed = false;

  @action
  void toggleColor() {
    isRed = !isRed;
  }
}

Creating a state manager in MobX isn’t complicated. First, you only need to define an abstract class that uses the Store mixin. After that, you can define variables to hold your state and add the @observable annotation. This’ll allow MobX to recognize them as stateful variables and keep track of changes to their values.

Next, you must define your functions using the @action annotation. The @action annotation marks a function as an action that will mutate the state.

When state class is implemented, go to the terminal and execute one more command:

flutter pub run build_runner build

The command above runs build_runner and generate main.g.dart file with _$ColorToggler class to make your state to be observable.

Finally, you create a class that adds your ColorToggler to your presentation layer.

class ColorTogglerApp extends StatelessWidget {
  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return MaterialApp(
      home: const ColorTogglerPage(),
    );
  }
}

class ColorTogglerPage extends StatefulWidget {
  const ColorTogglerPage({super.key});

  @override
  ColorTogglerPageState createState() => ColorTogglerPageState();
}

class ColorTogglerPageState extends State<ColorTogglerPage> {
  final ColorToggler colorToggler = ColorToggler();

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return Observer(
      builder: (_) {
        return TextButton(
          style: TextButton.styleFrom(
            foregroundColor: colorToggler.isRed ? Colors.red : Colors.indigo,
          ),
          onPressed: colorToggler.toggleColor,
          child: const Text('Change my Color!'),
        );
      }
    );
  }
}

A new stateful widget called ColorTogglerPage is created in the code snippet above. This widget creates an instance of the ColorToggler class and uses it to change the color of a TextButton. MobX requires using an Observer widget for basic state management while achieving reactive programming with minimal boilerplate code.

MobX requires more installation steps because of its heavy use of code generation. You don’t need to write much boilerplate code using MobX compared with BLoC, but all the boilerplate you don’t write in the beginning will be generated by MobX’s codegen feature in the end, so technically, it still requires a lot of code to run.

MobX is quite well documented, and for all its complexities (codegen and all), it’s easy to set up. You don’t need to figure out anything; you only need to follow the steps on the official documentation page.

However, testing MobX isn’t as easy as using it because the developers didn’t document steps to test Flutter apps using MobX. The only good reference for testing MobX Flutter Apps is in a GitHub issue in the main repository. It references an example of how you can test your MobX Flutter apps.

MobX fares worst when it comes to interoperability. While coding an app using MobX isn’t complicated and doesn’t require much when you use the codegen feature, it hinders the app’s customizability because you’ll depend on the code generated by MobX for your state management to work. If you still want to integrate MobX with a more complicated library such as BLoC, you’ll be challenged to make the two-state management solutions play well together.

Using MobX for state management in Flutter allows for a more efficient and manageable way of building reactive applications with minimal boilerplate code. It’s a framework-agnostic solution, so if you are already using it for your JavaScript projects, there isn’t any reason you shouldn’t use it in Flutter. If you want to learn more about MobX, visit their official documentation and start there.

Redux

Redux is a popular state management library for Flutter applications that follows the unidirectional data-flow pattern. If you have worked with React or any other frontend framework, you might have heard of a similarly named package. However, even though both libraries share the same name, it is maintained by different people.

A basic implementation of Redux in Flutter is based on the official Flutter Redux repository.

To start using Redux, you can create a state model and reducer function that takes in the current state and an action, then returns a new state based on that action. Along with an actions enum, that’ll indicate which action is being executed against the state.

class ColorTogglerState {
  final bool isRed;

  ColorTogglerState({this.isRed = false});

  ColorTogglerState copyWith({bool? isRed}) {
    return ColorTogglerState(isRed: isRed ?? this.isRed);
  }
}

enum Actions { Toggle }

ColorTogglerState toggleColorReducer(ColorTogglerState state, dynamic action) {
  if (action == Actions.Toggle) {
    return state.copyWith(isRed: !state.isRed);
  }

  return state;
}

Once you set up your reducer function and actions enum, the next step is to create a store that’ll hold your application state. Redux is similar to BLoC because you need to increase the store throughout your application by passing the store through the parent widget to the child widget. The only difference is, Redux doesn’t use a provider and consumer model.

void main() {
  final store = Store<ColorTogglerState>(
    toggleColorReducer,
    initialState: ColorTogglerState(),
  );

  runApp(FlutterReduxApp(store: store));
}

Suppose you have an app. You must pass the store from the main application entry point.

class FlutterReduxApp extends StatelessWidget {
  final Store<ColorTogglerState> store;

  const FlutterReduxApp({Key? key, required this.store}) : super(key: key);

  @override
  Widget build(BuildContext context) {
    return StoreProvider<ColorTogglerState>(
      store: store,
      child: MaterialApp(
        home: StoreConnector<ColorTogglerState, bool>(
          converter: (store) => store.state.isRed,
          builder: (context, isRed) {
            return TextButton(
              style: TextButton.styleFrom(
                foregroundColor: isRed ? Colors.red : Colors.indigo,
              ),
              onPressed: () => store.dispatch(Actions.Toggle),
              child: const Text('Change my Color!'),
            );
          },
        ),
      ),
    );
  }
}

What’s cool about Redux is, just like GetX, you can use the store inside StatelessWidget, removing any added complexity needed to handle state. This helps to simplify the codebase and make it easier to maintain, especially as your app grows in size and complexity. And if you look carefully, it is very similar to BLoC patterns.

When testing the Widget that uses Redux, it’s similar to how you would test Provider. Use WidgetTester and initialize store, dispatch actions to change the state, and assert the expected changes.

However, finding working documentation on how the tests will perform requires effort. So you need to find some working examples or experiments to get the tests running. The flutter_redux maintainers provide a GitHub repository with some example tests to help guide you through the process, but that’s about it.

Redux is a mediocre package for simplicity. It’s easy to understand but requires a bit of boilerplate code to set up the reducers and states. However, it’s still a viable option to be used as a primary or secondary state management solution when combined with all the packages mentioned in this article.

Redux is not the best option for beginning developers who are still familiar with state management in Flutter. Documentation is far between, but some third-party resources feature developers who have shared their knowledge when working with Redux.

Using Redux with Flutter can help simplify your codebase and make it easier to maintain as your app grows in size and complexity. Additionally, Redux is excellent for sharing state between screens because it separates the state logic from UI, and it’s less complex than BLoC.

If you want to handle state management in your Flutter app, consider using Redux. If you want to learn more about Flutter Redux, check out their official documentation page.

In this article, you learned about the top five state management solutions you can use for your Flutter app. You also got a comparison between the various state management solutions based on their simplicity and suitability for various uses. It’s essential to consider the needs of your app and choose a state management solution that fits those needs. Choosing the right state management solution can make all the difference in your app’s performance and maintainability.

This article showed you how many lines of code are required to set up a mini Flutter app using the respective state management solutions. However, it didn’t (and couldn’t) do any performance benchmarks or provide an exhaustive comparison of all available state management solutions for Flutter. That was beyond the scope of this article.

Here’s a popularity of the five featured state management solutions on 15 Feb 2023.
Popularity of State Management packages

And here’s a subjective comparison between the packages per article’s editorial team analysis.
Comparison of State Management packages

In summary, compared to other packages, Provider takes the prize as the No. 1 most-loved package by Flutter developers for its simplicity. However, regarding popularity in StackOverflow, Flutter BLoC wins as the one with the most questions and answers so far. This suggests Flutter BLoC has a bigger community and might be better suited for complex apps with multiple screens and data streams. Ultimately, the state management solution to use in your Flutter app will depend on your project’s needs.

Consider implementing one or more of the state management solutions discussed in this article and practice building your app with them.

We have referenced some Kodeco articles and official documentation for each state management solution, so check those out.

  1. Provider documentation page.
  2. Bloc documentation page.
  3. GetX documentation page.
  4. MobX documentation page.
  5. Redux documentation page.

If you need a Kodeco-guided tutorial on Flutter state management or want to learn more about app development, check our website.

  1. Getting started with the Bloc pattern
  2. Getting started with Bloc 8.0
  3. State management using Provider

We hope you enjoyed this article. Have you used any of the state management solutions mentioned in this article? Which one is your favorite, and why?

If you have any questions or comments, please join the forum discussion below!

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